Link Repair Promise

We guarantee you'll love our fast, friendly service - or we'll refund your money. 

We want you to be happy with our service! If it wasn't completed to your satisfaction, we'll work with you to get the job done right. Or if you'd prefer, we'll refund you in full for your service - no question asked.
Our 100% Money-back Guarantee applies:
To service charge only (Excludes parts)If your service was completed within the last 30 daysIf payment for your service was made to Link Repair

07424 385888
Extended hours, 7 days a week

We come to you to solve all your tech problems.

Windows, Macs, Tablests, Smartphones, TVs: it it hums, beeps or clicks - we can help!

What Our Customer Say?

What can we help you with?

Computer
  • Desktops, laptops, all-in-ones!
  • Virus removal
  • Slow computer
  • Won’t switch on
  • New computer setup
iPads & other tablets
  • Any brand: Apple, Samsung, Windows & all the others!
  • New tablet setup & training
  • Suggestions about apps that can help you be more connected, more productive and more entertained!
Phones
  • Any brand: Apple, Samsung, Windows & all the others!
  • New device setup & training
  • Suggestions about apps that can help you be more connected, more productive and more entertained!
TVs & speakers
  • Advice on, and help setting up, streaming services like Netflix
  • Device setup: Apple TV, Google chromecast & any others!
  • Sonos speakers set-up
Internet / WiFi
  • New wireless network setup
  • Troubleshooting a slow connection
  • Troubleshooting other problems
  • Help learning how to use websites like Facebook
Photos
  • Accessing them across your different devices
  • How to store them securely
  • Advice on sharing them with friends & family
  • How to upload them to social media like Facebook and Instagram
Email
  • Email setup & training
  • Accessing your emails on a mobile or tablet
Printers
  • Printer setup
  • Printing from smartphones
  • Troubleshooting
Privacy & security
  • Learn how to protect your identity online
  • Change your Facebook privacy settings
Data backup & recovery
  • Help setting up an online backup solution like Dropbox so your precious files and photos are protected
  • We’ll attempt to recover lost, missing or accidentally deleted files and photos

Call to get your local pricing! 07424 385888 or let us call you back.
Request Callback

Here are 8 reasons you'll Love Link Repair

We Come to You
We Come to You

No more dismantling your computer and lugging it to the shop, only to be told to come back in a few weeks! The Link Repairs come to you, at your home or office, and fix the problem on the spot.

Same Day Service
Same Day Service

You can request same day service before 10am Monday through Friday over the phone (excluding holidays), and we guarantee* to have a Link Repair at your door that very same day!

No Surprises
No Surprises

Our pricing varies depending upon where you are located, so give us a call and we’ll explain everything upfront. There will be no surprises.

Fixed Right, the First Time
Fixed Right, the First Time

All of our work is guaranteed, so you can be confident we will get the job done right.

PCs, Macs, Laptops and Servers
PCs, Macs, Laptops and Servers

Routers, printers, iPads, laptops and more – our expert technicians can work on all of your technology.

On Call 7 Days
On Call 7 Days

Link Repairs are on call 7 days a week to get you back up and running. That means weekdays, evenings and weekends!

Expert Technicians
Expert Technicians

Your computer’s sensitive information is completely secure. Every Link Repair is screened to ensure they’re as honest as they come, and, what’s more, they do everything on-site right before your eyes!

No Jargon, Just Plain English
No Jargon, Just Plain English

Every Link Repair speaks plain English. They can explain exactly what they are doing and why while they do it. Of course, if you simply want to leave them to it and receive a report at the end of the job, that’s fine too!

Plus, our service is covered by an unbeatable 30 day guarantee:

Fast

We almost always have someone standing by to fix your computer the same day you call – and if you call in before 10:00 AM, we guarantee* to have same day service available.

Friendly

If you are not happy – for any reason – we’ll happily refund you, or you can choose to have another Link Repair sent over for free.

Fixed

We will find a solution to your problem, or we won’t charge you.

Offered in addition to your rights as a consumer.

Service Area Map

  • England

    London

  • Other areas coming soon!
Not sure if your area is covered?

Give us a call at 07424 385888 and we will let you know.

Computer Repairs

PC, Mac or Laptop need repair? We come to you…

Link Repair delivers prompt, no fuss, same day computer repair services to customers, seven days a week.

Our computer support services computer support services include hardware and software repairs, system security solutions, wireless and wired networking services virus and spyware prevention and removal, data backup and recovery solutions and just about any other type of computer, Mac or laptop support our customers require at their homes or offices.

We can provide expert assistance for issues as varied as Virus Removal, Internet Security and Firewalls, Computer Help and Training. We can even help you with buying or upgrading a computer!

So give us a call now, you’ll get straight through to a real person right here in London!

*Terms & Conditions Apply
Legal Disclaimer: All registered trademarks belong to their respective owners. The use or mention of any trade name, product name, or trademark in this website is in no way intended to suggest that the trademark owner is at all affiliated with or endorses this site.

Recent News

For decades now, if you were buying a PC, you essentially had two choices when it came to the processor that ran it. For the most part, Intel’s processors under various branding such as Pentium or Core were what you were most likely to hit, with rival AMD’s CPUs generally found in lower-cost machines, or in some cases in machines pitched towards enthusiast markets such as gaming. It’s long been a race between the goliath that is is Intel and the smaller AMD.

AMD, however, had one particular advantage in that, back in 2006, it purchased one of the two big graphics card manufacturers, ATI. That gave it something of a positional edge when it came to integrating graphics performance onto systems running its chips, with ATI’s Radeon GPUs onboard.

Intel could pitch towards ATI rival NVIDIA to an extent, but that was essentially in the form of add-on dedicated graphics boards, which is fine and accepted for the gaming crowd, but problematic for a wider audience. Intel did persist with its own inhouse graphics solutions, but these were always lower-tier products.

At the recent Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, amidst a lot of news around its plans for everything from 5G to autonomous vehicles, Intel also announced a new tie-up to bring the embedded graphics on its systems up to scratch, by the unusual method of signing up with… AMD.

Yep, the two arch rivals are working together on Intel’s new “Kaby Lake G” processors, more formally for laptops the Intel Core i5-8305G and Intel Core i5-8305G and for desktops the Intel Core i7-8706G, i7-8709G and i7-8809G CPUs. All will feature Radeon GPUs onboard, with the laptop models featuring RX Vega M GL and the desktop versions running the more powerful Radeon RX Vega M GH graphics onboard. For its part, AMD is custom-producing the silicon that will go into these new processors, so they’ll be a little different from its existing models and the graphics drivers will have to come from Intel.

While there’s not much in the way of independent benchmarks to show performance, Intel’s suggestion is that on the laptop front, we’ll see new systems with solid 3D performance better than most chunky “gaming” style laptops by the middle of the year, while their desktop alternatives will allow for lower-cost entry into VR and AR experiences such as Windows Mixed Reality, the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive.

At CES 2018, only a couple of manufacturers showed off laptop systems running the new CPUs. For its part, Dell debuted the Dell XPS 15 2-in-1, a thin and light fully foldable laptop with a gore fabric chassis for heat dissipation and a new “maglev” keyboard. HP also showed off an updated version of its highly regarded Spectre x360 running on the new processors, with options for a 4K display. Both Dell and HP expect to ship in the US in March, with global availability to be advised.

The interesting aspect with both systems is that while they should offer high-end graphics performance, neither is in the classic “gaming” laptop style, which typically favoured huge displays, heavy carrying weights and massive fans. Instead, they’re machines that look like they should just be simple productivity offerings, but instead will pack some real punch.

More  

Usually when you hear about large scale security problems, it’s because there’s been an obscure exploit of some incredibly complicated code that somebody’s worked out a way around, leading to the need for software patches, or an entirely human error where access was pilfered via purely social means. Hardware flaws that affect computer security aren’t unheard of, but they’re (thankfully) pretty rare.

Or, at least, they were. It’s been revealed that there’s a major bug affecting processors supplied by Intel, and also possibly AMD and even the ARM processor architecture that runs most smartphones and tablets. While the full extent of the issue isn’t entirely public, because companies are rushing to release updates to mitigate its severity, the worst affected has to be Intel, simply because of the chip giant’s massive presence in this space. Chances are pretty darned good that if you’re reading this on a computer, it’s got an Intel processor inside. Even Apple got on the Intel train many years ago, and to give some perspective, the issue relates to processors up to 20 years old. If you’re running a computer more than 20 years old, you’re probably safe, but you’re also probably painfully slow compared to what a modern computer can do.

Dubbed collectively Spectre and Meltdown, the issue relates to the way that modern CPU architecture does what is called “speculative execution”. That’s pretty much what it sounds like; the CPU performs a task that it estimates may be needed before it’s actually asked for, because that way if you do require that task, it’s already done and performance can be boosted remarkably for just a little potential overhead. Speculative execution has been part of computing for a long time now, and the Meltdown issue essentially attacks the areas of the CPU that store that speculative information, potentially allowing malicious parties access to it.

To put that in more concrete terms, imagine you’re using a password manager (which, if you’ve been reading this column long enough, you should know I encourage you in no uncertain terms to do) on your computer, and your actions lead the CPU to think that you might need a password soon for some task. It speculatively fetches that information, stores it for a very brief time and then moves on, whether or not you needed the password. While it’s storing it, the Meltdown bug could (in theory) make it accessible via the exploit.

You’ll notice I’m couching my terms here, and the good news is that while the existence of the exploit is public, the specifics are not, and as such there’s no clear evidence that any systems, personal or major have been attacked in this way just yet.

The Spectre bug (which may also affect AMD’s processors and the ARM architecture that runs most phones and tablets) works in a broadly similar way, although both Apple and Google say that most updated phones and tablets should at least be partially hardened against attacks. Apple says that while there’s potential for exploits, doing so would be “very difficult” for hackers. That’s not quite the same thing as impossible, but if you’re updated, you should be fine.

The same advice is true on the PC/Mac end of the scale, although at the time of writing major software updates were still pending for Windows 10 and macOS to cover consumer and business systems. As always, patch early and patch often to keep yourself safe, but also be ready for something of a performance hit.

That’s to do with our old friend speculative execution again. In order to fix the issue, its ability to preconfigure scenarios before execution has to be dialled back, and that means a potential system performance hit.

Now, quite how significant this will be is a little tricky to gauge right now. Some early reports suggested the hit could be as bad as 30%, while Intel’s own releases suggest a more moderate hit for most systems, possibly as low as 5% or less. Bear in mind that it’s not just your own PC that may see a slowdown, with many of the world’s largest servers that provide web services also potentially liable for slowdown issues. Having said that, some, like Amazon, have indicated that pre-existing patching and security is already present on most of its services, so the impact there may be lessened somewhat.

So what should you do? In short, make sure everything’s updated, from any hardware updates that your computer manufacturer supplies, through to software updates and even browser updates, because when (not if) attacks do come, they’re likely to be delivered over the web. Make sure you’re running anti-virus software with up-to-date security as well, because while again that’s a cat and mouse game, keeping your system safe in 2018 is going to be, well, rather important.

More  

2017 was a year of some very large security breaches across all sorts of companies, from smaller online merchants all the way up to bigger brands, such as the uber-leak that came out of, well, Uber, where a data leak saw the records of some 57 million users worldwide compromised.

As such, you would think that overall, Internet users might be becoming a little smarter about how they operated online.

Sadly, it seems you’d be wrong. Despite all the breaches, despite all the warnings about what can happen with lax security, it seems that we’re all still way too addicted to using readily guessed passwords all over the place. What’s worse, the same culprits top the lists of most commonly found passwords online, year in and year out, and 2017 was no different.

Research from Splashdata showed that the same password combination was the most commonly found bad password online. Want to take a guess what it was? I’ll put a list here, so you can try to guess:

123456
password
12345678
qwerty
admin
login
starwars
test
computer
If you guessed “123456”, congratulations. Then again, if you’re actually using 123456 as a password anywhere (or anything else in that list, which just makes up a fragment of the top (really, it should be the bottom) 100 bad passwords of 2017) then please, please, stop doing so immediately.

It’s not that hard to see why folks use simple passwords, because they’re easy to remember, after all. If you’re online, the odds are that you don’t have just one password, but probably dozens to recall.

The problem is that if you’re using an easy password, and especially if you’re using it across multiple sites and services, it’s like having one easily guessed key. Even if you’ve got a more complex password that you use in multiple places it’s a bad idea, again because it’s a single point of failure. At least with a complex password, you’ve got a base level of security. With 123456, you’re essentially inviting people to come and peer into your digital life, identity and bank accounts. I’m going to take the guess that you don’t want to do that.

If there’s one trend I’d love to see reversed in 2018, it’s the prevalence of stupid passwords, and the rise of people properly using apps such as password managers. They can compute strong passwords for you and then store them in a single vault, giving you a simple way to cut down on password clutter and keep yourself secure online. That would be an ideal way to make 2018 less of a disaster year in security terms, but it won’t happen unless individual users change their security habits.

There’s no shortage of apps to choose from, including lastpass, dashlane, 1password, keepass and others that will manage your passwords for you at low or zero cost. Just like it’s all but essential to maintain malware protection on your PC, it should be essential to maintain a clean and properly secured password regime too.

It’s sadly all too inevitable that we’ll see further security breaches in 2018, and the control of those services may be beyond your control. Securing your own access with unique passwords, ideally managed by a secure password manager can make sure that even if there is a leak, its effect on you will be minimised.

More  

The ambition behind Google’s Street View was (originally) to provide a little more human context to people’s map searches. It’s all very good to say that a journey will take so many minutes, or that you need to make this sequence of turns in order to get to your destination, but it’s long been a hallmark of Google to use information more intelligently than that. That’s why Google’s Maps application can also provide loose traffic guidance as well, because the thousands of users running the app while driving provide it with a lot of speed data that it can crunch in real-time.

Still, Street View takes that a level further, giving you a visual representation of your destination, which can be extremely handy if you’re travelling somewhere you’ve never been before. After all, if you were describing your home to a friend, you’d most likely not only give them the address, but also quantify it with details, whether it’s the proximity of obvious landmarks or the colour of the roof to assist with them finding you.

Not that everything on Street View has to be quite that serious, because Google has also used the power of its 360 degree cameras to map out some slightly more out-of-the-way places. You might never get there for reasons of practicality or budget in the real world, but if you’re hankering for an end-of-year escape, all you need is a browser and Internet access.

So what’s on offer, then? Google has taken its street view cameras both high and low to unearth some really fascinating views and perspectives on the world today.

If you fancy somewhere up high, you can take in multiple views of the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa. Not high enough for your liking? How about a quick tour of the International Space Station, no space suit required?.

For those with vertigo, that might be a little bit much.

But there’s plenty of attractions back on solid ground to explore instead. Take a dive through the world heritage listed Great Barrier Reef or trek though the watery streets of Venice. If you’re more into hot holidays than wet ones, how about a live volcano in Vanuatu? Although that’s probably not one you should try to drive, all things considered.

If you’re a fan of HBO’s very popular Game Of Thrones, you can take a risk-free walk through many of the show’s most iconic locations in Street View. If you like your TV shows with a bit more longevity behind them, the BBC has even managed to sneak in Doctor Who’s TARDIS into street view by parking a police box in Earl’s Court in London – although that one you have to tap or click specifically on the police box to enter.

Street View can even take you places you can’t actually go any more, such as Uluru in Australia’s Northern Territory. There, Google combines its Street View camera views with spoken word guides to provide a complete tour that you couldn’t get any other way, and a fascinating insight into the world’s oldest continually surviving culture as well.

And if all this virtual wandering gives you itchy feet and you’re keen to travel, you can even use Street View to explore the inside of an Emirates Airbus A380, although no complimentary peanuts are provided for the trip.

More